History

There is plenty of evidence to suggest that the area had been inhabited since 500 BCE although an organized settlement was founded sometime around 800 CE. It is one of the 64 ancient brahmanagraamams .The present day areas of Niranam, and Kadapra on the western part of Thiruvalla were submerged under the sea before then.

It is interesting to note that the name Thiruvalla comes from the word "Thiru Valla Vazh", named after the river Manimala which was known as Valla puzha, suggesting that Thiruvalla was the mouth of river Manimala and hence was known as Valla vai(vai in old malayalam means mouth of river).Because of this Sri Vallabha temple was called "ThiruVallavayappan" which later reformed as "Sri Vallabhan" ThiruVallabha temple, considering that the deity is God Vishnu. This temple is one among the one hundred and eight vaishnavathirupathis in India. On the western part of Thiruvalla, the rivers Pampa, Manimala and AchenKovil join for a panoramic view. As in many other places in India, the culture and heritage of Thiruvalla are tied to its temples. Historical evidence such as copper plates and proclamations point to Thiruvalla as a flourishing and major center of spiritual and educational prominence in 1100CE. The SreeVallaba Temple governed a Vedic School with one thousand students and one hundred teachers. The temple also maintained a hospital in the service for the public at large. Entry for women was restricted to only once a year till the late sixties in the temple. The rulers of Thiruvalla belonged to the Thekkumkoor Dynasty, which had one of its headquarters at Idathil near Kaavil Temple. Idathil was the family name of Thekkumkoor kings. Today's Paliakara Palace is a branch of Lakshmipuram Palace of Changanacherry, which is a branch of AlikottuKovilakam of Pazhancherry in Malabar. Similarly, Nedumpuram Palace is a branch of Mavelikkara Palace is an heir to the Kolathiri tradition of Udayamangalam. The Thekkumkoor kings lost their control in the course of time and VilakkiliNampoothiris were rulers in 1752-53 when AnizhamThirunaalMarthandaVarma, the king of Travancore, seized it in a bloody battle in which the ruler was killed, though some dispute it, saying the surrender was peaceful as the Namboothiri was not naive to challenge the mighty army of Ramayyan, the shrewd and sadistic Dalava (head of administration and advisor - of Travancore. Ruins of Vilakkiliillam can be seen on the side of Kavmbhagom-Muthoor road.

The Kaavil market was once one of the most famous markets of Kerala where there were even foreign trade links. Even now the houses in this street are known as "Kaavil" among their friends and relatives and the houses in the now Pushpagiri-Tholassery area as "Malayil" because they are in an elevated area compared to Kaavil. The Kaavil market was actually situated in the street starting from Erankavu Temple to the Kaavil temple in the present Kavumbhagom. It was also the first settlement area of early Christians of Thiruvalla. We can see quotes about this then famous street and its people in the renowned Poem " UnnuneeliSandesham". This was the heartplace of Thiruvalla up to the 19th Century (East to M C road was forest area. Dens were found in the KSRTC garage area, which are now buried).The first school in Thiruvalla started somewhere in mid 19th century in Kaavil market, in the road to Pallippalam. Still all the major religious processions are required to pass through this way only, in spite of the new roads constructed parallelly.

Thiruvalla Christians were part of the autonomous Indian Orthodox Church, which was not affected by the schism which occurred in the 17th century due to the intervention of Portuguese colonists (Introduction of Catholicism in India). By 19th century, inspired by the work of the British missionaries, a reformation movement happened which eventually resulted in a schism, leading to the formation of Marthoma Church. Thiruvalla was never under direct British rule and before India's independence from Britain, it was governed by the Travancore dynasty. The Thiruvalla municipality started functioning in 1919, with Shri M.K. Kesavan Nair as the first Chairman of the Municipal Council. The constitution was officially approved on 8 October 1920. The municipal office has established several public health facilities, Libraries and Sports facilities.

Location: Thiruvalla is on the western border of Pathanamthitta District. The municipal town limits are Thirumoolapuram, Kattod, Kuttapuzha and Manipuzha. Formerly, some areas of present Changanacherry were parts of Tiruvallataluk. Now the boundaries of the taluk are Varattar Bridge on the south, Lappalam on the north, Pullad on the east and Neerattupuram in west situates in Alappuzha district. Pullad is the last point of Thiruvalla area & it falls in the Koipurampanchayath.

Thiruvalla is the meeting point of M C Road (Main Central Road/SH-01) and T. K. Road (Thiruvalla-Pathanamthitta-Kumbazha Road/SH-07) and links the eastern parts of the district with western rice bowl 'Kuttanad'. The Thiruvalla - Kayamkulam road is the most used link between the National Highway and the M C road. Thiruvalla also connects to NH-47 through the Thakazhi - Ambalappuzha Link. The nearest major port is in Kochi, nearest airports are in Kochi and Thiruvananthapuram at a distance of approximately 125 kilometres north and south respectively. The newly proposed Aranmula airport would only be about 18 kilometres away. The closest sea port, a minor one, is about 30 km away at Alappuzha. The district's only railway station, (Class A categorised) with an annual revenue of over Rs.15 Crores), is in Thiruvalla(TRVL) on the Ernakulam to Thiruvananthapuram/Cape Comorin rail route via Kottayam.

The national carrier AIR INDIA has a reservation office in Thiruvalla.

How To Get There
By Road : Pathanamthitta town, the district headquarters, is well connected by road to Thiruvananthapuram, Kottayam and Kochi. Kottayam is 22 km away. KSRTC Enquiry no:-2322366
By Rail : Thiruvalla is the nearest railway station.
By Air : The nearest airport is at Kochi 146 km away.
Sponsored Ads
Solutions PCdoctor Solutions

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

SITE VISITORS

Free Hit Counters